Monday, October 19, 2009

Artist Trading Cards

If you are a mom, dad, or grandparent, you probably have kid art work all over your refrigerator, on your walls and tucked in boxes in your closet. But what else can you do to celebrate the art your kids create?

Today is on the Mom Like Me segment on WUSA9 Amy Bevins, Assistant Editor of Washington FAMILY Magazine, shared information about Artist Trading Cards, a space-saving way to enjoy kid art.

So what are Artist Trading Cards?

According to Amy, Artist Trading Cards are pocket-sized works of art intended to be traded or swapped like baseball or Pok√©mon cards. Cheryl Miehl, art teacher at the Congressional Schools of Virginia has a wonderful article about them in this month’s FAMILY Magazine. Pick one up or check it out online at www.washingtonfamily.com

What makes Artist Trading Cards so unique?

Amy points out that the only “rules” to Artist Trading Cards are the size (2.5 x 3.5 inches) and that they are only traded, never bought or sold. Typically most have a label on the back with the artist’s name and the name of the artwork.

They can be made out of anything. Truly, this is a project where imagination is the only limitation. It is a good idea to use a heavy paper like cardstock to make the cards more durable. Then kids can use paint, crayons, markers, glitter, string, tidbits and scraps. Whatever they want.

Once you’ve made them, then what?

Then it is time to trade them. They can be traded with friends, other artists, pen pals, grandparents. Setting up a swap meet is a great scout troop or neighborhood project. Cheryl also mentions several online sites that can help you find other kids to trade with around the globe. It’s a great idea to connect kids around the world with art. Or maybe connect kids with cousins or grandparents that live far away. There are so many options for how to swap these cards. And because they are so small, they can be kept in a binder like baseball cards or even in a changing collage photo frame so that kids can showcase new ones as they get or create them.

You can find Chrely Miehl’s article and more great craft ideas on the FAMILY Magazine web site, www.washingtonFAMILY.com.

What other great ideas to you have for showcasing your children’s art?

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